Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Shunpiker Tour Stop at Pioneer Village, London, ON


On Mother's Day this year Dad and I had a table at Pioneer Village in London, Ontario.  It was one of the stops on the annual Shunpiker tour and admission was free.

Over 7,000 people came to the village to see the heritage buildings, crafts and walk down the streets of the village-- no cars.

The Marketing Manager, Dad, was in full swing telling the bee story, showing off our bees which we had put in an observation hive.

We borrowed this amazing hive that a fellow beekeeper made.  His workmanship is top notch and he did a beautiful job.  It even has a feeder at the side where sugar syrup, honey or water could be feed to the bees.

Sales were quite good and we gave a commission to the village.

At our sales table I usually have an empty hive, beekeeper clothing for the kids to try on, smoker, hive tools--I wear my shirt and bee belt and hat.

I also have some frames with photos of bees which look very real when the kids hold them up for a photo.

[Photo - Dad in full swing in charge of sales].

If you have combs you must have them in a clear container.

Mine is in a box with saran wrap over the top and of course I watched as a young child pressed down on the wrap, trying to touch the comb. They just can't resist.

No matter if you tell them not to squeeze comb, they just want to feel it's texture.

I also have some empty queen cells in a clear container, labelled, and queen cage to show how queens can come in the mail.


I find it's easier if we refer to the tasks that bees do and their hive like our own homes.... 

We tell them the bottom frame is the nursery; the top frame is the kitchen.

Sometimes the bees need a snack a little closer so they keep some food around the edges of the nursery.

People understand these explanations much more readily. 

I think it helps to demonstrate too that bees aren't too much different than us, wanting a roof over our heads and food to eat.

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